Romanian ZPM (Zero Point Module) - Enhancements Stage

  • 4.4K Views
  • Last Post 5 days ago
Fighter posted this 27 September 2019

As the ZPM thread has so much content that it started to load slowly especially on mobile devices, I'm creating a new thread continuing the initial thread.

If you want to search for specific information posted in the initial thread you can find it here:

 

Romanian ZPM (Zero Point Module)

 

In this initial post I'm also adding the donation section as I did in the initial thread:

If you find ZPM intriguing and the experiments and data I share here with you useful for your own projects and research, you may help the further research by donating:

 

 

Your support will be very much appreciated and it will be used ONLY for equipment and building customized electronics for further research and experiments.

If you're working with a ZPM replication please share your findings here like I do so we can enhance this device.

Thank you,
Fighter

Order By: Standard | Newest | Votes
Fighter posted this 29 September 2019

Another UA7812 voltage regulator from the MOSFET driver smoked:

So I decided to get rid of this approach with voltage regulator for powering the switch LED, now that LED is powered by the separate power used for cooling fans and switched on or off by the main switch. Those switches have two set of contacts so when switch is turned on it can close two separate circuits.

Another thing I did was to put high-voltage super-fast SF28G diodes on the MOSFETs but I had some problems with this, when exploring with different frequencies few times I had sudden surges of the power drained from the DC source, the source entered in auto-protection and the 12V/55W light-bulbs from ZPM's output became extremely bright and were destroyed. So far I lost 3 light-bulbs of that type, I have only one left which is still functioning (link to larger image here):

For some reason seems ZPM doesn't like those protection diodes and at certain frequencies it suddenly starts draining full power from the DC source and smoking the 12V/55W light-bulbs.

For now I have set optimum frequency and the 12V/55W light-bulb seems to work fine but probably as soon as I will encounter one of those frequencies the same thing will happen again. If it happens probably I'll remove these protection diodes, I don't like this behavior and it's provoking damages, I don't know what's the reason but it's a fact.

cd_sharp posted this 29 September 2019

You need to limit the current using a resistor to 10-20 mA, whatever your LED needs. 12v / R = 0.01A.

Fighter posted this 29 September 2019

It's okay, now I removed that voltage regulator and both LED's are powered by the separate circuit powering the cooling fans. I suppose that voltage regulator didn't liked the pulses present on DC source's input, it expected clear DC voltage there.

  • Liked by
  • Chris
  • Atti
Fighter posted this 30 September 2019

Sorry but that's an abnormal situation, not only the light-bulbs are destroyed but the DC source enters in auto-protection mode.

Is nothing to measure in that situation, I intend to avoid it as it could destroy my equipment...

  • Liked by
  • Chris
Fighter posted this 01 October 2019

Finally found some time to check the PowerSource, I verified IRFZ46N's drain-source continuity and found they were shorted so the MOSFET was damaged by that malfunctional DC adapter.

After I removed the MOSFET I checked that the circuit where its gate pin was is still receiving square wave signal:

 

As you can see the square wave was present so I mounted a new IRFZ46N. I must admit I had some big concerns as my soldering tool is not that delicate for this kind of fine/small circuits so few times I was thinking the copper areas where the MOSFET was soldered will be destroyed by the heat of my tool. There was a high risk of damaging the circuits from the MOSFET area...

After I finished I've made a test with the PowerSource module powering up a PowerSwitch module driven by my signal generator. Wanted to make sure the repair succeeded:

 

So now the PowerSource module is functional again but I don't intend to use again a cheap DC adapter, I bought a 12V/2A AC transformer and a big 4700uF electrolytic capacitor and using one of the bridge rectifiers I already have I'll build a dedicated DC adapter:

Of course I'll build it when I'll find some time again...

Fighter posted this 10 October 2019

Just a short post, a few days ago somebody asked me through email what's under that red tape covering the middle of the Metglas, if there is a gap and if it's something in it which I don't show:

There is no gap or something secret there, I did put that red tape when I first built the ZPM in order to to keep as close as possible the both pieces of the Metglas core together. To have everything crystal-clear I removed that red tape and used a strong plastic zip tie to continue keeping the pieces of the Meglas core together (link to larger image here):

All the information about ZPM is public, complete and published in this forum. And will always be this way.

It will be updated as I continue the research depending on the free time I can find.

Thanks,

Fighter

Zanzal posted this 10 October 2019

Hey Fighter, while it is very nice of you to show that there is no secret sauce hiding under the tape I would urge not to get distracted with changes to convince people. I take you at your word that the device is exactly as you describe it. Do what you think is good, but you don't need to appease or convince the naysayers IMO.

Chris posted this 10 October 2019

My Friends,

Hahahaha Yes, I agree with Zanzal!

"Whats under the tape", hahaha a 26 Plate Lead Acid Battery?

Apologies, they say: "Sarcasm is a metric for potential - Howard Stark"?

I agree, sweep the silly aside!

   Chris

Fighter posted this 10 October 2019

Hahaha, the joke about the battery made me laugh after a hard day at work, thank you Chris !

I don't know who the guy is but most probably he was thinking about some permanent magnets or God knows what kind of "secret" thing hiding under that red tape.... Well, I think he didn't expected me to reveal the "secret", I may disappointed him, I apologize for this...

patrick1 posted this 11 October 2019

lols yes, although it must be said. i dont see any nay-sayers.  more like kids in a candy store

  • Liked by
  • Chris
  • Vidura
Fighter posted this 14 October 2019

I've build the customized DC source for the PowerSource from Vidura, I tried to make it as compact as possible (link to larger image here):

I put the bridge rectifier directly on the transformer's core so the core can be used as a radiator if the bridge rectifier becomes warm.

But there are two problems with it:

  • the 4700uF/100V electrolytic capacitor seems it's not doing its job very well, I have a 620mV Vpp, the capacitor is brand-new;
  • the output is not 12V as I expected, it's about 16V.

(link to larger image here)

The transformer is 230V/12V and also brand-new (link to larger image here):

@Vidura, I suppose this is not acceptable for powering up the PowerSource, isn't ?..

About voltage I suppose I could put a resistor on output for lowering those 16V to 12-15V but I'm not sure what electrolytic capacitor I should use in order to have a linear DC.

I need to check on the scope the output of the 12V secondary, maybe the factory put more turns on it and it's actually 16V there...

Vidura posted this 14 October 2019

Hi Fighter, This voltage is normal when it is rectified and a capacitor connected. The rated transformer voltage is RMS , and so the output rectified and filtered will unloaded output the peak voltage. Anyway 16 volt should be ok, the driver IC is rated up to 18v if the resistors of the snubber circuit becomes hot you can lower the duty cycle on the preset of the module. Regards Vidura.

Vidura posted this 14 October 2019

I suppose that the scope trace is the ripple, 620mv is no problem at all , it is filtered again in the module , and the final stage, the power switch modules have a filtered voltage regulator, there will be pure DC always.

Fighter posted this 14 October 2019

So this output is acceptable for PowerSource. Then next when I find some time I will start tests with ZPM.

Thanks for clarifications Vidura, I really appreciate your help...

patrick1 posted this 14 October 2019

Hello Fighter. im liking your work. very much similar too mine, although your desk is in much nicer state ;=). 

i wonder how your machine will respond,  if you try too add a bridge rectifier across the output in addition too the light globe,  and put a second light globe at the bridge output,   ....

i am also curious if you were too use ONLY an output bridge , with a series globe on the bridge input, - and perhaps an additional globe on the output again,  i dont remember this being mentioned by our members as yet.

  • Liked by
  • Fighter
  • Chris
Fighter posted this 14 October 2019

Hi Patrick, thanks but you don't want to see the mess on my desk when I'm soldering something or repairing or building something new

About bridge rectifier on output, I had an attempt at the beginning, with a bridge-rectifier I've made with two channels and Schottky diodes (you can see images of it here: https://imgur.com/a/bn9gj).

It didn't worked, ZPM destroyed one of those electrolytic capacitors, the capacitor became that hot that I wasn't able to touch it for few minutes after I stopped the experiment. I suppose normal electrolytic capacitors are not made to withstand thousands of KHz frequency and considering these spikes of 100-200V I see on scope on output sometimes that poor capacitor had no chance because it was 10000uF at just 50V. Right now I don't intend to try that but I may try again in the future if I find electrolytic capacitors capable to work at ZPM's frequency. That was a failed attempt and I will need to find the cause of the failure before trying again.

Fighter posted this 14 October 2019

Today I found about one free hour so I've experimented with ZPM and Vidura's PowerTool.

I recorded this video:

 

Sorry I'm not that good at presenting, while i was talking I tried to not miss anything relevant therefore the pauses/delays - while talking I was always thinking what to talk about next.

Here are some images taken with this configuration.

In these images I have the oscilloscope's probe connected directly on ZPM's output (link to larger image here):

 

And in these images I have the oscilloscope's probe connected on the light-bulb's pins (link to larger image here):

The ZPM's specific waveform pattern is present on output, maybe a bit different than what I saw with my MOSFET driver but the cause could be that my driver is using one of those Cree MOSFETs, I intend to use one of those on the PowerSwitch in the near future.

A difference I noticed is the light emitted by the light-bulb on output seems to be pulsing at high frequency but it's noticeable, this is not something bad it's just something different.

As it happened with my MOSFET driver too, the MOSFET's radiator on the PowerSwitch is becoming very hot in 20-30 seconds so in order to be able to have longer experiments I'll need to build a active cooling system for the PowerSwitch like I did for my MOSFET driver.

Fighter posted this 14 October 2019

Another thing I did was to put high-voltage super-fast SF28G diodes on the MOSFETs but I had some problems with this, when exploring with different frequencies few times I had sudden surges of the power drained from the DC source, the source entered in auto-protection and the 12V/55W light-bulbs from ZPM's output became extremely bright and were destroyed. So far I lost 3 light-bulbs of that type, I have only one left which is still functioning (link to larger image here):

For some reason seems ZPM doesn't like those protection diodes and at certain frequencies it suddenly starts draining full power from the DC source and smoking the 12V/55W light-bulbs.

For now I have set optimum frequency and the 12V/55W light-bulb seems to work fine but probably as soon as I will encounter one of those frequencies the same thing will happen again. If it happens probably I'll remove these protection diodes, I don't like this behavior and it's provoking damages, I don't know what's the reason but it's a fact.

And another (short) update: I definitely need to remove these diodes because while setting back my MOSFET driver and finding optimal frequency I encountered again one of those frequencies, this time the light-bulb survived, the DC source entered in auto-protection mode but one of the Cree MOSFETs from the driver (from the channel which was in use) is dead. Definitely ZPM don't like those diodes there and they are provoking too much damage, I will remove them as soon as I find some time to take care of this...

patrick1 posted this 15 October 2019

Thiis strange flashing effect, is also present on my ZPM build. - however i think its due too the output on the signal generator. - which i do not believe is damaged.  it only happens as specific frequencies, - that i have noticed. - around 100-200khz. but critially it seems tied too the output voltage of the signal generator. -  

i am using IRFP N250's ,  which taper off between about 100khz and 800khz., and they seem too appreciate about 8-11v from my identical signal generator.  - and will not operate directly from the signal generator without at least 5volts. -    but i seem too recall when you were using the identical transistors, you had your signal generator voltage turned right up.  - which is also what i have been doing....  - this prevents the flashing phenomenon so far as i can tell .yet.

Fighter posted this 15 October 2019

Yes that is correct, I'm using minimum AMP (5V),I'll try to go up with the AMP value of my signal generator. I don't know how much I should go, I don't want to damage the PowerSwitch but this could be the cause.

Also recently I removed that red tape keeping together both pieces of the Metglas and I'm using a zip tie now, that could be a cause too, maybe that zip tie is not keeping the Metglas pieces together tight enough and there is a small gap in the center of the Metglas.

I'll investigate, thanks Patrick.

Fighter posted this 15 October 2019

I also had some private messages exchange with Vidura so it seems for avoiding that light-bulb flickering I should go up with the AMP on my signal generator while monitoring the voltage on PowerSwitch's MOSFET gate. I will take care of that when I find some time, sorry about this but I still have things to learn and to accommodate myself with Vidura's PowerTool.

Edit: One of Vidura's PowerTool tutorials is about this calibration step for the signal generator, I saw this video but I didn't do this step:

I'll need to do this one-time calibration step for AMP on signal generator in order to have it working well with PowerTool and avoid that light-bulb flickering.

  • Liked by
  • Zanzal
  • Chris
Fighter posted this 17 October 2019

I replaced the dead Cree MOSFET from my MOSFET driver and removed the diodes which caused problems and provoked damages:

Unfortunately this new MOSFET had a short life, I had an experiment where I tried to use a choke-coil to smooth the voltage produced by a 10A/75mV (0.0075 Ohm) current-sensing shunt on the input.

I learned a lesson, choke-coils provoke damages if they are placed anywhere in the circuit. The choke-coil made the DC source enter in auto-protection, burned the new Cree MOSFET and also destroyed the last 12V/55W light-bulb I had:

I remember I had similar damages before when i tried to use choke-coil put on DC source's output trying to smooth the noise/spikes coming back from ZPM.

So right now I'll need to order some new 12V/55W light-bulbs and as the last Cree MOSFET is already placed in the MOSFET driver probably I should order some new Cree MOSFETs too.

Until then I still have some halogen light-bulbs, I'm gonna use 2 x 12V/35W on output.

The goal of the choke-coil experiment was a first step in the process of building a real-time current and voltage sensor on input and output without oscilloscope, using just some 10A/75mV current-sensing shunts.

As this one experiment failed I changed the approach: what about using (for the beginning) some LEDs as visual indicators of the current passing through the shunts ? Of course that's not a precise measurement but the LEDs could provide at least a clue of what's going on with the current on input and output in real-time while experimenting with different parameters on the signal generator. A next step would be, if I succeed in rectifying the voltage provided by those shunts, to place digital voltmeters measuring in real-time the voltage provided by the shunts so actually providing in real-time the accurate current measurements on input and output.

So for this first step (LEDs as visual indicators for current) I took two identical LEDs from two identical Chinese lighters where those LEDs are powered by 3 x SR626SW (1.55V) batteries (link to larger image here):

So this is the result (link to larger image here):

So for now I have some real-time visual indications on current values on input and output.

From now on I can experiment not only with frequency but also with AMP and duty-cycle on my signal generator and see what's going on with the current on input and output. In the following photos I tried changing these parameters. In reality the luminosity difference between the two LEDs is easy to observe but seems my phone is amplifying low luminosity sources and dime high luminosity sources when taking photos in dark. But still you can see these differences (link to larger image here):

Just as a note: the current-sensing shunts are identical and the LEDs are identical in luminosity, I verified that by switching the shunts and LEDs between input and output and having the same results (in terms of LEDs luminosity). So I checked that both shunts and LEDs have the same characteristics.

And I took one photo which I think is very significant, I played with parameters in order to see if I can have the LED on input off while still having the LED on output on. In this photo you can see the current on input is clearly not enough to light that LED while on output you see the LED still on and also on the left 2 x 12V/35W halogen light-bulbs still on (link to larger image here):

I am aware about the voltage differences between input and output but considering on input we have 25V and on output we have spikes between 100V and 200V in my opinion this image gives an additional clue about ZPM's over-unity.

The next goal in building this real-time measurement system is finding a way to smooth the voltage provided by the shunts so that voltage becomes DC (link to larger image here):

If I can have clean DC voltage provided by the shunts then I can use it it with some digital voltmeters I just bought so I can have accurate real-time digital display of currents on input and output.

So for now the problem is how I find a way to get DC from this but without choking-coils (link to larger image here):

I'm thinking of building bridge-rectifiers using these SF28G super-fast diodes then maybe some capacitor(s) for smoothing the voltage. I'll see how it works.

I'll post updates as I find time to continue the experiments...

Vidura posted this 17 October 2019

Hey Fighter,
Sorry about the losses of the Mosfets, they are kind expensive. If I may make a couple suggestions to avoid this damages on your custom made switch:
use MOV as surge protectors on the drain - source terminals, the max. value K420 which clamps around 1100V maybe better a K400 for more safety margin. Do not attach other components as the Mosfet on the heat dissipator, although you use insulation pads, the high frequency currents will pass thru. Be careful when placing a grounded scope probe on the center tap of the coils, as this will shift the hot end (longitudinal high potencial) to the other terminals, where the switch and Power supply are placed , and may cause interferences and failure.

I wanted to say that I love the idea with the LEDs on the current shunts, this visual indicators really make our work easier, maybe you could add a second led with oposite polarity to the shunt, which will give indication on the direction of the currents also. keep up your good work, VIDURA. 

Fighter posted this 17 October 2019

Hi Vidura,

Yes they are really expensive and unfortunately they die so fast on every failed experiment. What can I say, I expected them to be more resilient but this is the cost of researching this kind of devices we're working with...

Right now I don't know what exactly changed in device's behavior when I placed those SF28G diodes between drain and source but after that I saw appearing these dangerous frequencies which killed MOSFETs and light-bulbs, that's why I removed the diodes. They were supposed to do exactly this - protect the MOSFETs, but it was exactly the opposite.

Right now I kind of hesitate to try with MOVs between source and drain of the MOSFET as this is the last Cree MOSFET I have until I can order another batch, I'll try when I'll have some backup MOSFETs.

About attaching other components on the radiator inside the MOSFET driver, I will not, I had that voltage regulator attached before but I found a solution to power that LED on the front panel without the voltage regulator. So right now I have only one MOSFET attached to the radiator, for the other channel of the MOSFET driver the MOSFET is missing, didn't mounted one there anymore.

About the center tap of the coil, I've made measurements there with oscilloscope probes some time ago, didn't had any problems or failures, are you saying that could destroy my equipment ?..

Thanks, necessity force us to build the tools we need for this kind of devices... These LED indicators are just the beginning, I will try to get pure DC voltage from those pulses you see on the scope in my previous post, if I succeed then I'll be able to use that DC voltage with digital (and maybe analog) voltmeters which will actually show accurate real-time current measurements on input and output, I hope I'll find a way to accomplish that.

Yes, having a second LED with opposite polarity is also a nice idea and very useful, that way we can "see" the currents going in both directions through the shunts, I will try that, let's see how it works

Fighter posted this 17 October 2019

Vidura, I tried putting a LED with inverse polarity on both shunts (from input and output), the LED doesn't light up at all.

But I found something on output, when connecting LED's positive (green connector) to the negative of the other LED while the negative of the LED (white connector) is in air we have some kind of one-wire transmission, the LED light up just as powerful as the one from the shunt (link to larger image here):

This makes me think of something, should I be concerned about the electromagnetic radiation around this thing ?...

Maybe I should make a box covered with aluminum foil like a full Faraday cage to cover ZPM while it's active ? I was thinking about this sometimes before but I didn't noticed any negative effects while or after making experiments. Maybe I should reconsider this.

Zanzal posted this 17 October 2019

When searching for a mosfet - I recommend this approach - Sort by rdson - look for as low as possible - find mosfet with appropriate voltage rating and lowest gate charge (Qg), pref around 50 nC or less. Check the price per unit and if it is reasonable then it may be worth using. You may need to compromise a bit, for this reason you may find that adapting your circuit to a lower voltage mosfet may offer an advantage.

A quick explanation of my perspective:

Thermal failure is a universal failure so low rdson is typically the most important characteristic, especially if the power is greater than a couple watts.

Voltage rating at first glance may seem important, but I've found that some circuits can easily exceed the voltage rating for a mosfet and the mosfet may clamp voltage at its avalanche voltage. So a mosfet rated at 60V may not fail immediately but could just avalanche (causing losses and extra heating). You can try to design a snubber circuit to clamp the voltage spikes to avoid needing to use a high voltage mosfet. So while operating voltage is an important consideration, there might be better ways to handle spikes than just using a HV mosfet. You can experiment with adding snubbing circuits and see if it negatively impacts AU device performance. I can't tell you if this is appropriate for your device.

Frequency range will determine if the gate charge along with the on/off and rise/fall characteristics are deal killers. For low frequencies, these details may be relatively unimportant, but once you start to go above a couple kHz these things may begin to make huge differences. Keep in mind, high rdson compounds any problems you will have here as the mosfet may spend less time fully on or fully off and rdson only tells you the lowest nominal resistance in the fully on state.

Anyway, these are just opinions from a non-expert. I am curious to know if you find mosfets that work well for your application. When you do, please share the part number.

Fighter posted this 17 October 2019

Hi Zanzal, I'm also a non-expert but I find it's a lot to learn from your post.

C2M0160120D made by Cree/WolfSpeed seems to be the fastest HV MOSFETs on the market for now and, even if they are expensive, during my research (after Vidura told me about them) I didn't found information/opinions about more performant ones.

But using your criteria of selecting who knows, maybe I'll find others better in terms of matching ZPM's circuit, I'll keep these criteria in mind and I'll search.

Of course, if I'm gonna change the MOSFETs model I'll post updates here.

Thanks.

Vidura posted this 17 October 2019

Hey Fighter, I am using the Cree MOSFET s in all my latest experiences, and have not lost one till the moment, the performance is really excellent and the RDS on the lowest in that voltage range. But I always use MOV , it's a must, also the zener diodes for gate protection are strongly recommended, and I didn't note any negative side effects for using this protections. Regarding the effect of single wire transfer it is obvious, you have high frequency longitudinal oscillations, this is why the current not always behave like expected, and the reversal LEDs on the shunts might be off most of the time, but they will indicate when a reversal current flows, which might occur only with very specific parameters. I hope this helps and explain some things. Vidura

Jagau posted this 18 October 2019

Yes Vidura 

 zener diodes for gate protection are strongly recommended and a totem pole activation for the gate is also a must to preserve the shape waveform that activates the gate.

Hi fighter
I just received my metglass and I notice they have a very high saturation chest 1.56 Tesla compared a ferrite it is well better.
Nice experiment to do.

It is a hitachi amcc320

Jagau

Fighter posted this 18 October 2019

@Vidura I know about their performance, the only issue I had was about those dangerous frequencies after I put these protection diodes, I don't know why it happens but seems ZPM don't like having these diodes on MOSFETs.

For sure I intend to give MOVs a try when I'll have some backup MOSFETs for replacement just in case MOVs create the same behavior.

About the single-wire transmission that was fun to see but still after I saw that phenomenon I wonder how strong and how extended is the electromagnetic field around ZPM and if I should take measures to shield it during experiments. What would be your advice about this, what would you do ?

About the additional LED indicators, I understand they may become active in certain situations so I'll certainly add them to the shunts, even if they don't light up all the time as I kind of expected your idea is neat and very helpful, thanks !

@Jagau That's a very nice core ! I suppose you will try a ZPM replication ? If so welcome to the club, I'm glad and I'm curious to see how your experiments work, please share them...

Yes, saturating that core would be kind of difficult, that's one of the special characteristics about Metglas. Being made by Hitachi make me sure your core have exactly the same physical characteristics (related to alloy composition and production process) just like mine because those guys have a strict production and quality control process.

I gathered two quotes from the old ZPM thread which I think could be useful in understanding more about Metglas:

I'm putting links about AMCC-200 technical specs here:

Hitachi - AMCC Cores Technical

Hitachi - AMCC Cores Presentation.

I recommend checking how Metglas cores are produced and read about their special characteristics so you know what you're dealing with; remember Metglas was something produced in 70s for military and space technologies.

Actually this is Metglas - a iron core. Its composition is 85-95% iron, 1-5% boron and 5-10% silicon as specified here. But what's special about this core is it's made of foils created by melting the compositions under high heat then cooling it down so fast (almost instantly) that the Metglas alloy don't have time to form a crystalline atomic structure when it become solid again like any metal does when being melt then being cool down normally. That's why the metals obtained this way are also called amorphous (their atomic structure is not crystalline like the usual metals).

You'll notice the differences about AMCC compared to other cores, enjoy your experiments and can't wait to see it at work !

Vidura posted this 18 October 2019

Hey Fighter, Note that the SF28 diodes are not TVS devices, and thus can not be considered as protection, if connected in parallel they would only bypass the internal body diode of the MOSFET. But as the internal diode of the cree devices is already very fast, it don't make much sense to place it in that way. I think there was a suggestion to put a diode in SERIES with the MOSFET , to prevent the effect of bus pumping, or current being sent to the supply, which would make more sense. But maybe it is better to test this things with a cheaper MOSFET first, or an IGBT, for a short time would be okay. Regarding the radiation (longitudinal) , there are several reports of being beneficial for health, but this might depend on the frequency also, actually there exists a device based on Tesla oscillators used for cure several diseases, development of a Russian investigator. I have many years worked with Tesla coils and i think i didn't note any negative side effects. But if you like you can anyway use a shielding, or keep some distance for any case. The only thing you should take care is that at the hot end of the coils you might get rf burning if you touch with bare fingers, this effect is stronger with lower frequency, so the core devices can make smoke your fingers in an instant 馃榾. Vidura.

Fighter posted this 20 October 2019

@Vidura, you mean to put the SF28 between DC source and MOSFET driver on the positive wire ? I remember I tried that with another diode, I admit it was not a super-fast diode. I can try this scenario too, thanks.

About touching the ends of the coils, I was thinking to get some protection gloves for electricity, for safety I'll buy some. Considering there are spikes of 100-200Vpp, at what frequency could that become dangerous ? Right now I don't go below 80 KHz, usually I'm in 100-1770 KHz range.

Posting updates...

I've build a new version of current indicators, this time I added a second LED with inverted polarity so they will show currents going in both directions through the shunts (link to larger image here):

This is a test with normal polarity (link to larger image here):

And this is a test with inverted polarity (link to larger image here):

For some reason the LEDs for inverted polarity (positioned lower) don't have the same luminosity even if the current should be the same like with normal polarity. All circuit is made using normal 0.8mm wire (just like the one ZPM's coils are built with) enclosed in plastic. I verified the solderings and found no issue.

But for now it's not that important, I'm interested more in what the upper LEDs are showing.

As a note, the fact that a LED indicator is off doesn't mean there is no current, it means there is not enough current to produce enough voltage to power-up the LED.

When I find some time again I will try to rectify the pulsed voltage produced by the shunts, meaning this:

I intend to build a bridge-rectifier using some super-fast SF28 diodes and then some electrolytic capacitor maybe (choosing the right one to smooth that waveform will be difficult, I'll need to do a lot of tests).

If I'll succeed then having pure DC produced by the shunts would mean I can use digital voltmeters to get real-time accurate reads for currents passing through shunts.

Zanzal posted this 20 October 2019

About touching the ends of the coils, I was thinking to get some protection gloves for electricity, for safety I'll buy some. Considering there are spikes of 100-200Vpp, at what frequency could that become dangerous ? Right now I don't go below 80 KHz, usually I'm in 100-1770 KHz range.

There is a certain frequency threshold above which your heart muscles cannot respond quickly enough and so alternating currents above that frequency won't stop your heart. Not sure where this frequency is exactly, but I vaguely recall it is between 2k and 4k. Above that frequency you should be fine. Below that, and you are at risk any time you are grounded as your blood vessels may act like conductors and your finger tips would be capacitively connecting you to the circuit. High currents should cause burns at any frequency but these would likely be over your skin at very high frequencies. Not sure what the current threshold is for that.

I worry more about my family when I am doing these experiments. Little ones especially have a way of getting into trouble grabbing things they shouldn't. A family member checking on you after you make a mistake may suffer the same. Precautions are good. Take note if any family member or guest has a pacemaker. Stay safe.

Vidura posted this 20 October 2019

@ Fighter
The Fast diode would be placed between the ZPM and the mosfet better, I am not sure if the current capability of the SF 28 is enough.
About the led indicators of course there is a threshold voltage , it will only lite with considerable current spikes, I have thought about this.
@ Zanzal
regarding the current, generally it is dangerous at low frequency or DC specially, above 30Khz it is considered RF , and the skin effect begins to predominate, so the current will flow on the surface, the RF burning is superficial normally , anyway for safty keep the kids at distance when experimenting with this kind of devices.

VIDURA.

Jagau posted this 24 October 2019

Hi fighter
My C core mestglass is progressing well.
I build the insulators in acetate and I prepare to mount the 2 coils.

I have a little technical question to ask you, so with about 150 laps for the primary you have an inductance of 101.4 mh and for the secondary 300 laps with 365 mh on an AMCC200.


What I do not understand if i check inductance factor and with the specifications of the manufacturer (photo below) we have 1.26 uh / N2 for ungap of 0.5 mm.

 


If I remove the gap we could say that it is about 2 uh / n2
so with 101 mh it would take 200 laps for the primary.
This is the question I am asking.


JL Naudin used an AMCC320 which is like mine and is a little bigger than the 220 and with 24mh he had 100 laps.
Could you tell me if I have the right number of turns?
It does not matter if you do not know I will find.
thank you


Jagau

Fighter posted this 24 October 2019

Hi Jagau,

This is what my LCR meter shown after I built the coils:

It has two bucking coils (marked the with "L" and "R") winded in a way that when they're connected in series and powered on, their magnetic fields are opposing.

L coil has 101.4mH inductance and approx. 150 turns made of 0.8mm standard copper wire for coils. These are the complete characteristics I measured with my LCR meter (link to larger image here):

R coil has 365.5mH inductance and approx. 300 turns made of 0.8mm standard copper wire for coils. These are the complete characteristics I measured with my LCR meter (link to larger image here):

I ran auto-calibration before making measurements just to make sure. About the number of turns, the counting error is maximum +/- 10 turns (because I've made the coils manually), so yes it's 150/300 turns ratio with maximum +/-10 turns counting error. The gap is displayed in the latest photos, it should be 0mm because I stretched as much as possible that zip tie keeping the pieces together. I would say to follow one of the coil ratios reccomended by YoElMiCrO, ignoring the turns counting error mentioned I consider my ZPM configuration with 150/200 ratio is matching one of them. It's possible that the inductances shown by my LCR meter are because I've made the coils manually and the turns are not ordered as they would be if using a coiling machine, I'm sure the inductance is different between coils made manually and coils made with a mchine.

Jagau posted this 24 October 2019

Hi fighter
thank you for answering,

I will do my 2 coils and see how they behave

Jagau

Chris posted this 24 October 2019

My Friends,

If I may interject here for a minute.

Fighters Coils are: 1 : 2 basically, as YoElMiCrO kindly pointed out:

 

N2 = sqrt(n) * N1 = sqrt(0.25) * 300 = 150 

 

Which is Fighters Coil Combination!

 

We have a situation here, where Fighter is using 25% Duty Cycle on the Input:

 

What occurs during all that Off Time?

No one is looking at this???

This 25% Duty Cycle is the same as the 0.25, the Quarter Wave. 25% Duty Cycle is a Quarter Wave, they are the same thing! This is important, please, something people need to start thinking about.

   Chris

cd_sharp posted this 25 October 2019

The sqrt(0.25) is a measure of the time constants ( t ) difference between the coils. 5 time constants is a number which defines the time needed for the current to reach max value which is equivalent to max magnetic field.

Chris posted this 25 October 2019

Hey CD,

The Coils reach maximum Current ( I ) when five time constants have passed.

The equation is: T = L / R

  • T is five Time Constants and is measured in seconds
  • L is the Inductance and is measured in Henrys
  • R is the total circuit Resistance and is measured in Ohms.

 

So no, not really correct, as the coils become resonant, yes we do get maximum Amplitude, but this cant always be assumed this is maximum Current ( I ) for the applied Voltage ( V ).

Resonance, especially this type of Resonance, is quite different. Magnetic Resonance.

   Chris

cd_sharp posted this 25 October 2019

Hey, man

During the off-time, assuming both coils are charged, they will decay. L2 will try to decay twice faster than L1. That is a changing magnetic field ahead of the changing magnetic field of L1. This results in delayed EM induction in L1, as we named it counter-reaction and it's adding up to the decaying field of L1.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Chris posted this 25 October 2019

Hey CD,

Ah ha, yes you're right!

The Interactions between the Coils:

 

In Fighters ZPM we see a very interesting Spike:

 

Marked in Red is the process I describe above in the video. The Coils are like a spring, and Act and React together in Magnetic Resonance. This is an Electromagnetic Induction dance, or disco. Electrons are getting some moves on and the Disco is going off...

This is excess Electromagnetic Induction after the fact! After the Input has excited the Coils into this Resonance.

   Chris

cd_sharp posted this 25 October 2019

I wish to go further with my imagination. While L1 is discharging slowly, the voltage over L1 is not what it's supposed to be if L1 was discharging alone. The voltage induced by the L2 collapsing adds up to the voltage over the ends of L1 and it causes a much faster discharge (almost instant) than normally. We have increased V, we obtained increased I.

This almost instant collapsing of L1 causes EM induction in L2 and so they start to dance as you said. This device uses the Reduced Impedance Effect so visibly. I look forward to playing, I'm waiting for some hardware..

Fighter posted this 25 October 2019

Talking about hardware, some updates on my side, I just received the shipment with 6x12V/55W light-bulbs:

... and I have a shipment with 6 x Cree MOSFETs which is still on the way. This time I bought the MOSFETs from TME, they are more expensive comparing to Digi-Key but as TME is in EU I'll avoid the tax for shipments coming from outside of EU which is signifiant.

So my backup stock will be restored soon and I'll have replacements available again for experimenting.

Jagau posted this 31 October 2019

hey fighter

slowly but surely
My acrylic supports are made
and I found (maybe a way to make coils more symmetrical)
I tried to make this coil winder


Jagau

Fighter posted this 01 November 2019

Hi guys, unfortunately I need to take a break from researching because I need to relocate. I will find another place to rent (the owner of this one wants to sell it), pack all my stuff and transport it there. As you can imagine this will take a while and during this process I will not be able to do experiments. I will resume the research as soon as it's possible. Sorry about this but this is how life is sometimes.

Please continue your research, I'll still be here but I will not be able to present anything new until I resolve this problem.

Chris posted this 01 November 2019

@Fighter

Good luck with your move, I hope it all goes smoothly!

   Chris

Fighter posted this 20 December 2019

Hi guys, sorry, moving to the new place and setting things up took much longer than I expected.

I just received a shipment from China and I'm currently working on a custom DC source where I can have real-time and (hopefully) accurate readings of input. The real-time measurement module is this one. For calibration I'm using a PeakTech 9035 energy meter which is using power factor for very precise readings and calculation. The measurement module seems pretty accurate and it's consuming about 0.6 - 0.7 watts. Few images without load (link to larger image here):

And few images with a light bulb as load (link to larger image here):

As a custom DC source I'm gonna use a 24V/1.5A transformer, a bridge rectifier and a 10000uF/50V electrolytic capacitor (link to larger image here):

What I hope is by using the new measurement module I will get accurate real-time readings when powering up the ZPM as I actually measure the power before going into the transformer so the readings will not be affected by the signal sent back by ZPM.

By using this simple customized DC source I avoid having in readings the power consumed by the more complex DC source I used until now.

I'll see if this plan works.

The only concern I have is how to protect the transformer, its maximum current is 1.5A and while sweeping ZPM frequencies it's possible to find ranges where the current drawn by ZPM to go to 1.5A or higher. Also having that big electrolytic capacitor it's possible to have 1.5A or higher inrush current when powering up this custom DC source. I'm looking for a 1.5A current limiter so I avoid burning up the transformer, is there a simple solution for protecting it ?

Vidura posted this 20 December 2019

Hey Fighter, Good to have you back on the bench. Really a good approach your new supply module. For the transformer you don't have to worry , it is not likely to damage it, unless it would be short-circuit for a considerable time. It will not output much more than the rated current. You can put a 2.5 or 3A fuse slow type, that's all needed to protect it. The current peaks will be drawn from the capacitor. Good luck with the experiments. Vidura.

Fighter posted this 20 December 2019

Thank you Vidura, it's good to be back

So the transformer will not be damaged if I don't short-circuit it ? It simply will not provide more than 1.5A even if ZPM temporary tries to get more ? That's a relief, I was thinking I will damage it during the experiments.

I really appreciate and I'll follow your advice.

YoElMiCrO posted this 20 December 2019

Hola a todos. Disculpen por postear en Espa帽ol. No estoy frente a un PC para utilizar GoogleTraslator. Actualmente la hip贸tesis sobre la regi贸n negativa de la permeabilidad magn茅tica poco a poco se ha convertido en teor铆a mediante muchos experimentos. La cuesti贸n es que necesitamos de las dos entidades para producir trabajo 煤til. Los n煤cleos de tipo Amorfo, Nanoperm, Nanocristalinos y los utilizados en el control del duty magn茅tico ser铆an los ideales.

YoElMiCrO posted this 20 December 2019

La cuesti贸n es que la relaci贸n entre Br/Bs sea lo m谩s pr贸ximo a la unidad. De esa forma aseguramos que que la energ铆a almacenada en el inductor sea m铆nima y podemos comparar la extra铆da del medio.

Postdata. Este segundo post pertenece al anterior, solo que no se como desde el m贸vil se public贸 y no tiene la pesta帽a de editar.

@Fighter, publicar茅 mi r茅plica de tu ZPM al menor tiempo posible, pues he estado s煤per liado en otros proyectos. De nuevo, disculpen.

Fighter posted this 20 December 2019

Hola YoElMiCrO, no se preocupe, podemos usar Google Translator. Entonces, otros experimentos confirmaron la teoría de la región negativa de la permeabilidad magnética? Eso es interesante. Siéntase libre de publicar en cualquier momento aquí.

Fighter posted this 20 December 2019

Cuando tienes tiempo, está bien. Tengo mucha curiosidad acerca de su replicación de ZPM y los resultados de las pruebas.

Zanzal posted this 20 December 2019

I'm looking for a 1.5A current limiter so I avoid burning up the transformer, is there a simple solution for protecting it ?

Resettable polyfuses can be helpful for some situations. They can stop large surges or sustained currents over a long period of time. The cost is added resistance which will waste power. That can be a good trade off in some cases.

Fighter posted this 21 December 2019

Thank you Zanzal, I'll check for polyfuses.

cd_sharp posted this 21 December 2019

Hey, Fighter, very good to have you back, my friend. I remind you that there is no need to measure the input. I'm convinced the ZPM is very much AU. I would put effort into making it power bigger loads. Just my opinion, I hope you don't mind.

Fighter posted this 22 December 2019

Hey CDd_Sharp, thanks. No worries about your opinion, the idea is I think it should be a required step in this stage of enhancing ZPM having real-time input and output accurate readings, else I would go in blind during enhancement experiments and I wouldn't know if I'm going in the right direction or in the wrong direction.

Unfortunately after the last testings I'm not sure about the accuracy of this method of measuring input as it doesn't match the measurements made on oscilloscope, I'm adding the previously made oscilloscope measurements here for reference:

Hey Fighter,

You have my Vote!

Purely Resistive Load, no phase angle to worry about! Figures look good!

 

Input:

 

Output:

 

Well done! Good work Fighter!

You have "Generated" a full: 鈥3.574784鈥 Watts above your Input for a COP: 鈥1.09396

Calculator is attached in zip format below if you want to use it.

   Chris

and also because this customized DC source I made seems to modify the behavior of the ZPM.

I'll present the data of the latest experiments.

The customized DC source plus the measurements module are consuming about 5.3 watts.

Basically the customized DC source is consuming about 4.1 W and the measurement module about 1.2 W.

Sorry but the PeakTech energy-meter don't have display light but in the next photos is shows 227.4 V, 0.042 A, 5.2 W.

Photos (link to larger images here):

In the next photos I show ZPM powered by the customized DC source where the probe of the oscilloscope is put directly on ZPM's output (link to larger images here):

As you can see the measurement module shows 62.7 W, much more than the 38.04 W previously measured using the oscilloscope. Also you may notice the ZPM's specific waveform is not present, I don't recognize this waveform and it means ZPM's behavior is changed.

In the next photos I'm using exactly the same parameters I just switched to my usual DC source (link to larger images here):

You may see the ZPM specific waveform is present again now.

In the next image you may see the different behavior when using both DC sources, on the left is the waveform when using my usual DC source (ZPM pattern is present) and on the right when using the customized DC source (link to larger image here):

Then I placed oscilloscope's probe directly on the light bulb pins and searched for another optimum frequency and repeated the tests (with the customized DC source then with the usual DC source).

These are the images made while using the customized DC source (link to larger image here):

And these are the images made while using the usual DC source (link to larger image here):

As you may see it's the same changed behavior, the ZPM's specific waveform is present when using the usual DC source and it's not present when using the customized DC source.

For curiosity I wanted to see what's between the transformer and the bridge rectifier, this is what I see on oscilloscope (link to larger image here):

As a conclusion I consider this way of real-time measuring of input a failure as it's far away from what the oscilloscope shown and also the customized DC source is modifying ZPM's behavior. Seems there is something in the usual DC source and that something is missing from my customized DC source.

Also I was thinking of other possible reasons for failure. The bridge rectifier is made for 50Hz and as we know ZPM is sending high-frequency pulsed power back which for sure rectifier's diodes are unable to block/handle. Probably that power is reaching transformer's secondary and creating magnetic field which is fighting the magnetic field of the transformer's primary. That would be a possible explanation for what the extra-watts shown by the meters.

This hypothesis may be confirmed by the fact that the bridge rectifier and transformer's core are getting hot in about 10 minutes which is strange because the transformer is rated for 1.5 A but during the tests the current used is just 0.33 A. At 0.33 A both transformer and bridge rectifier should not get that hot and that fast.

I suppose another approach is needed for real-time measurements and also I wonder what exactly is in the usual DC source and is missing in the customized DC source making ZPM to change behavior when using the customized DC source. Many new questions and hypothesis resulted from these new experiments even if they failed, I'll think about them.

As usually any suggestions are welcome...

Chris posted this 22 December 2019

Hey Fighter,

An excellent post!

All AC Energy Meters especially the ones with Toroid, or Current Transformers, are no good for accurately measuring anything but the AC Voltage and Current at the specific Frequency that they are rated for.

Almost all Higher Frequencies are eliminated.

Especially Frequencies that are coming back in a much higher frequency range that the ratings are indicated.

I am sorry to let you know now about this as I see two other posts with this idea, I should have said before.

The same is true of the AC Energy Meters that you have plugged into your power board. They have a very limited bandwidth and are not accurate unless you are using the specific frequency they are rated for.

This is just one video showing how far out they can be:

 

Now this video does not allow for Phase Angle, being a resistive load, it will be negligible, but this is @Rated Frequency and there is a several watt discrepancy, d, there, even at a phase angle of X. 

Vd = 122.7 - 120.4 = 2.3V

Id = 1.28 - 1.279 = 0.001A

Pd = 鈥157.056鈥 - 鈥153.9916鈥 = 鈥3.0644鈥 watts.

This is not including any phase angle there may be in there. Of course phase angle, cos(theta), may be very small due to the resistive load, with very little Capacitive / Inductive component.

@50 Hz or 60Hz they are ok, @600Khz they are hopeless.

   Chris

 

P.S: Sorry, I see your edits, I edited also. You have a good point, we should start looking at the Input Power Circuitry also. A Battery might be a good choice for a Source as it contains no Circuitry as such?

 

P.P.S: The much slower speed of the E I Laminated Silicon Steel Transformer will absorb the Higher Frequencies and not respond to, in time, the Energy coming back. Turning this Energy into extra Heat. Similar to how an Induction Cooker works.

 

Fighter posted this 22 December 2019

Hi Chris, the meters are put before the custom DC source, they are actually measuring 220V/50Hz input. But I agree there is something wrong with the readings, I'm still organizing and adding data to the previous post, I'll explain and add a conclusion.

Fighter posted this 22 December 2019

I just saw your latest edits, Chris, you're right, there are too many flaws in this approach. Most of the components are made for 50 Hz and can't handle/block high-frequencies. I was hoping that by moving the measurements block before the transformer and measuring 220V/50Hz I will escape from the high-frequency power sent back by ZPM. Seems it's not the case unless I use a bridge rectifier which can handle/block high-frequency power coming against it. Also there seems to be some component in the DC source which is missing in my customized DC source and that missing component is the cause of ZPM's changed behavior. Many things to think about but also some lessons learned...

Edit: A battery could be a good idea, don't know if there are some ~25V batteries, maybe rechargeable so I avoid significant costs for each experiment. But it's possible that a battery could modify ZPM's behavior too if there is "something" in my usual DC source which is actually actively working with ZPM to behave this way. That "something" needs clarification: does it exist and if yes what component is it ?

Chris posted this 22 December 2019

My Friend, I agree!

A reason a forum, to share our experiences is so important, a documentation archive that will serve humanity for decades to come!

There is always more to learn! We humans think we know everything, in general, but the truth is, there is more to learn than what we have already learnt!

The humans that can memorise entire physics volumes, is nothing compared to a life time of real world experience.

My friend, this is invaluable knowledge for others!

EDIT:

Edit: A battery could be a good idea, don't know if there are some ~25V batteries, maybe rechargeable so I avoid significant costs for each experiment. But it's possible that a battery could modify ZPM's behavior too if there is "something" in my usual DC source which is actually actively working with ZPM to behave this way. That "something" needs clarification: does it exist and if yes what component is it ?

 

Yes, agreed. However, a Battery will serve as a better reference point as to the Actions / Reactions that occur with the ZPM than a DC Power supply as it has no Circuitry. High Frequency DC Pulses will be absorbed, Charge the Battery, much better than random Circuitry that exists in a DC Power Source. I was thinking about 2x 12V 7Ah or similar Rechargeable Batteries as a possibility?

Best Wishes

   Chris

Fighter posted this 22 December 2019

Thank you Chris, I'll take into consideration this approach.

Vidura posted this 23 December 2019

Hey Friends, Recently I made some tests related to noise , and found that there is some kind of it which is virtually impossible to filter or screen out. That the high frequency current passes thru a steel core transformer and interfere the digital instruments is not surprising at all. Also it is possible that a lot of power is dissipated in the low frequency rectifier. Regarding the change of the wave form of the ZPM when using the simple transformer, could it be a voltage drop the cause? There might be a threshold voltage for the ZPM to perform properly.As the lab PS is voltage stabilized, it is supposed to maintain the selected voltage, no so a standard transformer, there can be major variation depending on the load conditions. I agree that a battery would give valuable comparison. If it is actually some circuitry inside the PS that is interactive , it should be possible to find which components. Some time ago I had an issue with my PS , the current limiting was damaged, so I opened it to check, it is of the analogue type, a multi tapped steel core transformer, and linear voltage regulation, not switch mode type. I was a bit surprised about the few components on the output line, a single electrolytic capacitor , a precision current shunt, and a few more components. The only digital components are the voltage and current meters. I guess the Switch mode type PS has more filter components , to keep the switching noise low. But if Fighters PS is the analogue type, there are only a few possibilities of interacting components. By the way, I got a notice from costumes about a packet, this could be the metglass core, hopefully, now nearly four months ago was shipped from Europe. So maybe soon I can join the testing of the ZPM. Vidura.

Chris posted this 23 December 2019

Hey Vidura,

Re:

If it is actually some circuitry inside the PS that is interactive , it should be possible to find which components.

 

I agree! and this could be assistive of course in our furthering the overall understanding of Input Power and the reasons it can sometimes behave differently.

Four months, wow, that's a slow delivery, sounds like Australia Post! Our postal service is very slow also depending on what country the source is coming from!

I think you will find the Metglas Core very useful!

   Chris

Fighter posted this 23 December 2019

@Vidura

Hey Friends, Recently I made some tests related to noise , and found that there is some kind of it which is virtually impossible to filter or screen out.

So filtering the noise sent back by ZPM is impossible...

Also it is possible that a lot of power is dissipated in the low frequency rectifier.

This seems to be the case, the bridge rectifier and/or the transfomer become hot in about 10 minutes so those extra ~30W consumption shown by energy meters most probably are dissipated in that heat.

Regarding the change of the wave form of the ZPM when using the simple transformer, could it be a voltage drop the cause? There might be a threshold voltage for the ZPM to perform properly.As the lab PS is voltage stabilized, it is supposed to maintain the selected voltage, no so a standard transformer, there can be major variation depending on the load conditions.

This could be the case of voltage drop. I could make a test with the usual DC source by setting the voltage much below 25V and check how the waveform looks like.

I agree that a battery would give valuable comparison.

I will try this way, I will look for some local supliers for rechargable battery/batteries.

If it is actually some circuitry inside the PS that is interactive , it should be possible to find which components. Some time ago I had an issue with my PS , the current limiting was damaged, so I opened it to check, it is of the analogue type, a multi tapped steel core transformer, and linear voltage regulation, not switch mode type. I was a bit surprised about the few components on the output line, a single electrolytic capacitor , a precision current shunt, and a few more components. The only digital components are the voltage and current meters. I guess the Switch mode type PS has more filter components , to keep the switching noise low. But if Fighters PS is the analogue type, there are only a few possibilities of interacting components.

My DC source is switch-type, I remember I chosen it specifically to be this way, that's why is has about 16kg weight. The model is QJ6005E and the manufacturer's page is here:

http://www.nbjiuyuan.cn/Single-output/products_21_en.html

Unfortunately there are no schematics anywhere on internet but I found a image from inside (link to larger image here):

I see that big current-sensing shunt and also I see there are a lot of electronics, some of them could possibly actively working with ZPM but I have no idea which one.

On the manufacturer's site I see this option but it's for measurements when voltage drop occurs, I don't think it will help with high frequency noise:

By the way, I got a notice from costumes about a packet, this could be the metglass core, hopefully, now nearly four months ago was shipped from Europe. So maybe soon I can join the testing of the ZPM.

I would be glad if you could join the ZPM research, having another ZPM in experiments with different power source and measuring instruments will be very helpful in clarifying some aspects and ZPM's behavior !

@Atti

This is just an opinion, not to be accepted but to consider.
In my opinion, the load on the transformer of a single DC source is probably too close to the maximum load. (36 VA)
Therefore, the peak current draws too much down the buffer capacitor voltage. Whirring tension.
Therefore, the input waveform on the secondary side of the individual transformer.
If you could replace it with a larger transformer (maybe 200VA)
waviness would decrease.

Another solution could be to use L-C filters before the ZPM input.

 

I agree, the voltage drop could be the reason for ZPM's behavior change, I'm taking this into consideration. I could try a test with the usual DC source but setting the voltage much lower than 25V and see how the waveform looks like. About filtering out the high-frequency noise sent back by ZPM, seems it's not a possible solution according to Vidura, seems this is a particular situation where filters don't work. I remember I tried with a choke coil on input and ZPM don't like that, I had extensive damage: DC source entered in auto-protection mode, the light bulbs on output burned and also the MOSFET was destroyed.

If you are using a factory lab power supply, then its wiring diagram would be good to know.

Unfortunately I could not find any schematics on internet for my DC source. You may find more details in my previous replies to Vidura.

Vidura posted this 23 December 2019

Hey Fighter and all following, I don't know if it's really impossible to filter that interference, but I can assure that it's not an easy task, I have tried with common mode choke, differential mode choke, different types of R C L filters, but the interference in the digital instruments continued, specially with the parametric oscillator circuit and HVTesla coils. The analogue meters seems to remain unaffected. And yes it can be very tricky to make accurate measurements with this kind of devices, but anyway we don't need so much accuracy, If we have a reference to work with it will be helpful to make improvements and monitoring the situation, no need for ten digits below the comma. The PS you have is very similar to mine, this is the transformer type with linear voltage regulation. It is not a Switch mode supply, this refers to high frequency converters with small ferrite cores. The components immediately on the output are the rectifier, electrolytic capacitors and the current shunt (a spiral of copper wire) , and the connectors for the sensing electronics. I had an experience when a interference affected the sensing electronics and the voltage regulation failed, the supply delivered 50V instead of the rated maximum of 30v. Regarding the Battery I would suggest the lead acid batteries, they are tougher for withstand transients, high frequency components and so. The lion batteries might fail in this condition.

Hopefully this helps some. Vidura

Fighter posted this 24 December 2019

So the power sent back by ZPM is "seen" by power meters but its considered/calculated as power sent by the DC source. Basically power meters can't detect direction ? Makes sense as the power meters just measure the magnetic field of the current passing through a conductor, not the magnetic field's polarity. Very interesting, thanks for the video Atti.

Chris posted this 24 December 2019

My Friends,

I see a lot more confusion entering at the moment than is necessary! There is no need for any complexity!

I am not going to fill Fighters thread with partially off topic content, instead, I am posting a response here.

Realistically you do not want to use any High pass or Low pass Filters when doing measurements! not unless your'e looking for anything specifically! So this talk of filtering and so on is distracting and confusing. 

Like I said:

P.S: Sorry, I see your edits, I edited also. You have a good point, we should start looking at the Input Power Circuitry also. A Battery might be a good choice for a Source as it contains no Circuitry as such?

 

I think it is only logical to keep this as simple as possible, no point introducing complications when none exist!

   Chris

Fighter posted this 3 weeks ago

Hi Chris, I just want to say I saw again the Non-Inductive Coil Experiment videos and a lot of things became much clearer now.

The fact that before I watched them in the evenings after finishing work didn't helped in really understanding them.

Now using this short vacation I watched them again one after one with fresh mind without being tired from work and everything makes sense and I understood a lot. For example I understand now why the input coil must have fewer turns and the wire must be thick, I understand why the duty cycle must be as lower as possible while the secondary (bucking) coils are still interacting correctly, I also have a fresh perspective on ZPM's behavior, actually (as Cd_Sharp told me in a conversation) the "R" coil of ZPM is composed from two virtual coils even if physically is just one coil: a virtual coil is perfectly equal with the "L" coil and it's opposing perfectly to "L" coil while a second virtual coil is actually the input coil and has 150 turns (too many). But unlike your device my (virtual) input coil is connected to one of the secondary coils. That's the reason why the behavior of ZPM is different from the behavior of your device even if they're actually using the same principle of the bucking coils.

So I recommend to all the members to find time when they have fresh mind, few hours available and when they're not tired (from work) and watch all the videos one by one carefully and they'll understand a lot about the interactions between bucking coils, why they behave like that and how to improve the interactions and where to look at during the improvements.

I intend to join the replication of your device as it can help me in understanding better ZPM and help with the improvements for ZPM. As I don't intend to dismantle ZPM (it's the only prototype, as far as I know there are no replicas yet) I think I will buy another AMCC-200 and start working on a replication of your device. Will take some time to receive the core and to design and order different coil supports to a CNC company but I think it's worth the effort. Who knows, maybe during the research we can make a better device, a hybrid getting the best things from your device and from my device.

EDIT: I definitely need to see the videos again as I'm sure there are still details which I missed. I downloaded the videos with the original resolution and I'm adding them to my archive so just in case if you ever need them just let me know, you have also a backup of the videos here.

Chris posted this 3 weeks ago

Hey Fighter,

Your ZPM is extremely important and the entire reason I showed the Experiments I did. Your work is critical in moving forward!

I urge all Members replicate your ZPM!

So please, I urge you to continue your work! And, as you say, a replication may help also!

Yes exactly, they use the same principles! Exactly the same! Just a different way to get to the same ball park!

Soon, a new geometry will come and it wont make sense, especially after these experiments. I have said we can have problems with the Machine choking off the Magnetic Fields, but there is a way around this. So for this reason we need to keep open minds.

The thread: Some Coils Buck and some Coils DONT gave a lot of information, the problem is, because the figures were poor, no one paid any attention. However, massive amounts of information can be gained from this thread. Information that the average EE will say is wrong, but, I have experiments to prove this is true...

I agree, keep your ZPM intact, its an important machine!

It takes time for understanding to be achieved, I have had to repeat myself many times, but people are starting to get it... Its thanks to your machine and others like Graham Gunderson and even Tinman and his RT which was very important for the momentum of what we are doing.

People look for proof, they see scam... Its sad, and its so extremely obvious! With just a little understanding, people can build these machines for a few dollars and an hours work!

Isn't that just crazy!

I would like to quote:

On that “blessed day” when we arrived and witnessed the VTA Device in operation it is a day I shall never forget. To actually see a Device that only would cost approximately $200 dollars and create all the clean energy you would ever need was “awesome”. I know I have been “altered” ever since knowing that such a Device existed.

Ref: ATTACHMENT floyd sweet.pdf - Maurice Campbell Documents.

 

You can see, Maurice commented on the Cost in the above quote! How cheap it was!

We will see a day, where angry people, angry for being ripped off for so long, will storm the streets! We will never again allow Government govern us! We will never again allow Bankers to be in control of Banks!

The establishment is doomed! They have bought down a mountain of rubble on themselves!

Names of Humanity's Traitors will be published! Some will be punished for their crimes! Many will take their own lives for the guilt they incur on themselves!

I say, isn't it easier to just be Good! Good always wins, eventually!

   Chris

Jagau posted this 2 weeks ago

Hello Fighter


I have tried several configurations with different number of laps without obtaining good results.
I even tried a configuration with 3 coils as in the photo and there I have a better result but not even like you.

 

I do not give up and will come back later with others try.
Maybe I misunderstood your configuration?

In the meantime I hope your move went well and also say did you do any other tests?

Jagau

Chris posted this 2 weeks ago

@Jagau,

If I may, would you mind sharing more information? Turns, Wire Gauge, Frequency, Output Voltage under Load, Load resistance, Circuit, and other info you think might be relevant?

We know from Experiment and the Math, the Length of the Coil can also play a role: B = μ0N/LI

Where:

  • B = the Magnetic Field in Tesla.
  • μ= the magnetic constant.
  • N = the Number of turns.
  • L = the Length of the Solenoid.
  • I = the Current.

 

It is important that sufficient B Field does sufficient work to produce the required effects. If B is not sufficient, or the Actions of each B Field is not sufficiently interactions, then results will be poor.

I hope this helps some!

   Chris

Jagau posted this 2 weeks ago

Yes indeed Chris,


Ok I tried with 20 gauge wire with coils of 200 and 100 turns each in partnership mode and also in additive mode with different voltages of 9, 12, and 24 volts, and a 12 volts bulb lamp, nothing wanted to do. Working frequency was 325khz, But I know that the metglass core is optimized for a max of 100 kHz.


I would have a theory however.


As the Metglass is a material of high permeability and that it surely has, as Don Smith said, the characteristic of a piezoelectric material. So I think Fighter found exactly the right length of wire and the number of turns it takes to trigger this piezoelectric effect.

  The Metglass becomes at a precise frequency a feedback transformer which provides more energy than it consumes.


I am currently testing this theory through various experiments.


Jagau

Fighter posted this 2 weeks ago

Hi Jagau,

I didn't do additional tests, I just returned from the holidays break. Within 4-5 days I'll have enough funds (this entire moving thing was extremely expensive) to buy a second AMCC-200 so I can begin replication of a second ZPM and experiment with different coils configurations without dismantling the prototype.

Can you post the waveform you have on your ZPM's output ? Is the specific ZPM pattern present there ?

Did you do the frequency sweep to find the optimal frequency for your configuration ? Also, just for double-checking, use a compass to confirm the polarity of the magnetic field for each coil just to make sure the magnetic fields are opposing.

What duty-cycle did you tried ? The optimal frequency range change if duty-cycle is changed.

If possible could you post a video of the frequency-sweep procedure for your ZPM ?

About frequency, 100KHz is not the maximum for Metglas, I remember I was going near 700-800KHz in the initial tests and I still had a 12V/5W light bulb lighting. Right now with the 12V/55W light bulb I'm playing within 90-160KHz range. Remember the optimal frequency changes dramatically when load is changed or duty-cycle is changed, with a 12V/5W light bulb it can go near 700-800KHz but with a 12V/55W light bulb 160KHz is the upper limit. Also what I found since the beginning is that going below 80-90KHz dramatically decreases ZPM's performance, it's starting to get more and more power from the DC source (at least what the DC source's display is showing, I know that's not a precise reading).

About voltage, I always used 25V for ZPM, I tried going much below 25V (like 18V, 15V, 12V) but the results were poor. So if you have 24V stay with that voltage, if possible go to 25V (I don't know if you're using a variable or fixed voltage source).

About the exact length of wire, I doubt I found it from the first try, I'm not even sure about the exact number of turns, they are 150/300 ratio with error rate of +/- 10 turns for each coil. Also, I'm not sure if the positions of the coils on the core matters, probably not.

I'll try to assist as much as possible.

Jagau posted this 2 weeks ago

Thank you very much for all this information.
Glad you were able to relocate to experiment, yes the moving and the time of the holidays, are expensive.
Ok one thing that I had not noticed the ratio is coils is 1: 2 is that right?
With this new setup I will redo tests, I used 1: 1 already there is a good difference.
OK thank you


Jagau

Fighter posted this 2 weeks ago

You're welcome. Yes, 1:2. Try with 150/300 turns ratio.

Fighter posted this 1 weeks ago

@Jagau, a question, can't tell because the photo is too small but is the wire you use multifilar ? 'Cause I don't use multifilar, I use solid copper wire, that could make a difference, I don't know.

Jagau posted this 6 days ago

Hi fighter


I use 20 gauge solid copper cable.
In the photo it is a configuration with 3 coils that I had tested.
2 coils at the top and one at the bottom.

Jagau

Fighter posted this 6 days ago

Got it, my mistake. Thanks for the clarification.

Jagau posted this 6 days ago

One thing that I noticed in your configuration is the mounting of the 2 coils in a very specific place.
I think they do not want to be located on the gap as I have mounted them on the central gap, I think it matters, they must be located on each side of the gap.
Checking out this theory.


Did you leave a gap in your config fighter?


Jagau

  • Liked by
  • Chris
  • cd_sharp
Fighter posted this 6 days ago

Jagau, there are no gaps in my ZPM. My coils are mounted in the middle of each U piece of the Metglas (link to larger images here):

and your coils are mounted over the two places where the Metglas is cut.

I suppose the places where the coils are mounted on core don't matter. But if they matter then there is a difference between my configuration and your configuration.

Just to clarify, this is where my coils are mounted on the core:

And this is where your coils are mounted on the core:

As I said at this moment I have no data showing that the position of the coils on the core matters. Why do you think the positions matters, do you have any data indicating this ?

EDIT: could be a misunderstanding, let me clarify - by gaps I mean air-gaps, the spaces between the two U pieces of the core (the places where the core is cut as indicated by red arrows in the image below):

So yes this is a difference between my configuration and your configuration, If you think it matters then you could try to place the coils in the same positions like I did. I know it is difficult to place coil supports there, I needed to order to CNC pieces which could be put in place and when glued compose the supports.

This is a hand-made design I've made to explain to the CNC guy what exactly I want (link to larger image here):

As a note: I've made these coil supports when I was trying to replicate Bearden's MEG so I wanted to place the coils on the core exactly as it's specified in the MEG schema.

Jagau posted this 5 days ago

No Gap,

ok thank you

it is very clear


Jagau

Members Online:

No one online at the moment

Since Nov 27 2018
Your Support:

More than anything else, your contributions to this forum are most important! We are trying to actively get all visitors involved, but we do only have a few main contributors, which are very much appreciated! If you would like to see more pages with more detailed experiments and answers, perhaps a contribution of another type maybe possible:

Donate (PayPal)

The content I am sharing is not only unique, but is changing the world as we know it! Please Support Us!

Donate (Patreon)

Thank You So Much!

Weeks High Earners:
The great Nikola Tesla:

Ere many generations pass, our machinery will be driven by a power obtainable at any point of the universe. This idea is not novel. Men have been led to it long ago go by instinct or reason. It has been expressed in many ways, and in many places, in the history of old and new. We find it in the delightful myth of Antheus, who drives power from the earth; we find it among the subtle speculations of one of your splendid mathematicians, and in many hints and statements of thinkers of the present time. Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic? If static, our hopes are in vain; if kinetic - and this we know it is for certain - then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature.

Experiments With Alternate Currents Of High Potential And High Frequency (February 1892).

Close