Lenz Free Pickup Coil

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Zanzal posted this 4 weeks ago

I've been playing around with a system for the last few days that involves Lenz free power transfer. I'm not entirely sure where it is leading, but I've made a few observations. It is not a traditional transformer as the power output by the system is not proportional to the input. However, it is also not clear at this point whether such a system can be even 100% efficient much less OU. Nevertheless it is very interesting to play with and may be unexplored territory for new innovation.

Here is the basic pickup coil:

This would be the secondary of the system, the primary being anything you want. I used both the L1 from GBluer's slayer exciter kit which works well, and I also stuck a MrPreva in the center which worked very nicely. 

To get the most out of the system your primary will need to be frequency adjustable. Diodes can be anything that works well with Avramenko plugs. Capacitors should be high voltage. The system acts as a potential pump converting what needs to be many thousand volts of potential into work. An air core is not strictly necessary, so a MOT can also be used. I've not done much testing with this but basically any system that can produce large voltages and can be tuned to a nice resonant frequency will produce power with minimal draw on the primary. 

This is made possible because no current (or perhaps very little) flows through the secondary. Should the two ends of the secondary be joined current will flow and the potential will collapse.

 

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

Hey Zanzal - Awesome!

You hit the nail on the head, using the term "Resonance" - An Antenna, or a wave guide is the same thing, A piece of wire, at resonance has a specific wavelength and the wavelength and the Coil along with the associated distributed capacitance or external capacitance will allow for Magnetic Resonance.

Nice work and thank you for sharing.

   Chris

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Zanzal posted this 3 weeks ago

So I thought I'd share something additional regarding this setup. My signal generator outputs a sine wave and almost no current (< 1uA). In fact the current is so low my multimeter won't even read it on the uA scale. Yet when the signal generator is attached to a 5 turn primary and the frequency is tuned to resonance the output power scales with the signal generator sine wave voltage (current is always < 1uA).

To make things even more strange when one end of a large inductor/antenna (1lb spool of 28AWG wire) is placed at one of the LED anodes and the system is re-tuned to resonance the LEDs glow even brighter. Although adding the current meter into the circuit to measure the LED current decreases the LED's brightness (not a resonance thing but impedance I think), the LED reads a current of 4mA voltage of 52Vpp but the input coil has < 1 uA 20Vpp. (Currents and voltages measured in AC). So anyway, I'm pretty much at a loss except to say the current used in the primary represents wasted energy. This system apparently doesn't need it.

Oh and if all that isn't odd enough, I only need to attach one terminal of my signal generator to the primary. Though it works better when primary is a closed loop.

EDIT: The above was incorrect. I was not reading current correctly due to a faulty fuse in my multimeter, signal generator does put out current around 35mA @ 20V.

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Wistiti posted this 3 weeks ago

Hey Zanzal! Thank you for sharing your research! It is interesting effect...

Just curious, have you try adding earth ground on the load side of your circuit?

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Zanzal posted this 3 weeks ago

Hey Zanzal! Thank you for sharing your research! It is interesting effect... Just curious, have you try adding earth ground on the load side of your circuit?

Hey Wistiti,

I've touched various areas of the circuit with the oscilloscope ground on occasion just to see if anything interesting happens. I've got nothing to report on that. I am only in very earlier stages studying this effect and I wasn't doing a lot of power measurements just using the brightness of the leds to give me an indication of power relative to previous test runs.. Even tuning it I no longer use the oscilliscope to compare voltage waveforms, just looking at the LEDs I can tell if the configuration has improved on the previous configurations.

Chris suggested isolating my signal generator. I'll report back if that has a significant impact on the results. Considering only the primary would be effected by the grounding I don't think its a factor but if I am wrong or I discover something new I'll post an update.

A couple of things I am looking at: I think the Avramenko plugs I am using could be made more efficient. Also, if current isn't required in the primary then the implications are astonishing. I'd want to build an efficient isolated HV sine wave generator to test that further.

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Chris posted this 3 weeks ago

Hey Zanzal, this is great to see! Thanks for sharing!

I am still thinking about your results, so I will keep it short.

Power, Apparent, Real and Reactive, all have relationships with Time and Phase, but being that your setup is using so little current, it would be very hard to measure anyway.

Average power, however, can only be amplified with the methods you point out, Amplifying Current (We know how to do via The Mr Preva Experiment) and Amplifying Voltage, well we all know how to do that.

Your results sound very promising! A very interesting experiment! Again, thank you for sharing!

   Chris

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Wistiti posted this 3 weeks ago

Hi Zanzal when i talk about the ground i mean a real earth ground like a coper pipe burried in the ground... here is a video on an experiment i have done with HV in the past where you can see the intensity of the light goes up when i connect the ground to the circuit.

I think you are on something. I will replicate when the time permit and share here my result.

Again thank you for sharing! it is the way we learn together!

Zanzal posted this 3 weeks ago

Thanks guys, so I learned a good lesson today. Sometimes a measurement error really is a measurement error. I tracked down the problem to a bad fuse in my multimeter. Which of course really makes me wonder how it managed to read 4mA through a bad fuse yesterday. A mystery I am not really interested in solving ATM. My multimeter may also have some issues as it read AC current inconsistently depending on the range selected so at 00.00mA and 000.0mA it gives wildly different results. A sign that I need a better measuring device. The high value for current at resonance was around 35mA. It appears that current output by my SG is significantly higher than my output, total energy at resonance is still not significant enough to invest in high quality measuring devices to determine how close to unity the system is. So unfortunately, I still have a lot of work to do to see how efficient the system can be.

Wistiti posted this 3 weeks ago

hehehe! it is also the way we learn!

This kind of mesure error happen many time in my case! it is even frequent when dealing with battery! Dont be mad about it, it is experiment that forge your research! i will give it a try and let you know. ;-)

 

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Jagau posted this 3 weeks ago

     hi zantal

very interesting,

it is very important to know the specs of our DVM, mine in AC voltage is not more than 50 Khz and DC maximum 5 Khz.

I prefer to take the oscilloscope to take measurements closer to reality.

Still, the way to take current measurements with an oscilloscope is more complicated than voltage.

I believe that will be an interesting topic for everyone.

 

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 2 weeks ago

Hi Zanzal.

Excellent experiments  -thank you.

You could try catch MQR "Microscopic Quantum Resonance", and the miracles would begin. MCR disclose yourself at some unknown point in this range 3,73 kV +-100V. You need variable HV DC voltage,

Also try to close loop at 377 ohm impendance (free space impendance) or maybe 7000 ohm (Tesla MFT transformer impendance) using some precise vairable resitor and variable spark gap.

Be extremely careful while working with microwave owen transformers (MOTs) because high voltage and high current produced by latter. Also will be very interesting trying direct polarising different electro positive/electro negative metals in different branches of circuit in your experiment setup.

Best wishes

Enjoykin

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Zanzal posted this 2 weeks ago

Hey Enjoykin, glad to see you around again. I like the suggestion for playing around with resistance value. Could be some interesting effects by adding resistance. I'm definitely expecting greater performance once I move up in voltage. I've got a few cheap 12V to 10KV transformers on order that should do the job. The oscillating DC idea is good too. I'll definitely try that, as I am kind of curious what happens if we never reverse the magnetic field.

Do you have any suggestions for improving the conversion efficiency of the Avramenko plugs? I tried Schottky diodes but they actually seem to perform worse. If you have any insight into how to make the Avramenko plugs more efficient even modest improvement could result in gains needed to push this into overunity.

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 2 weeks ago

Yer, you have right where are not one, but many interesting and unknown effects (anomalies),  while plaing with different imepndances and materials at output of your setup.

One of mostly important is dissociation of Bose-Einstain Condensate (Avramenko's term), anomaly power output, kind of white fog rays (Tesla radiant) and many odd biophysical anomalies.

There are also involving creation proceses of Lighting balls.

Regards

Enjoykin.

 

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 2 weeks ago

Flyback transformer are generaly excellent choice for you lab.

About diodes, try playing with old american silicon rectifier diodes, with lot of inverse leakage current. This is because from some top high voltage point from the secondary of your HV Flyback transformer, where you usualy start pumping the circuit, while introducing inverse leakae current, you will get slow decaying exponential HV voltage, which for sure stuck the MQR point (which is voltage dependent) and after integrated Etheric energy boorst in some HV capacitor, and disharging it through the some basic impendance points, which are in direct relationship with Ether.

From Tesla's work i know he had tuned his MFT at 7000 ohm output impendance (producing scalar fields), while also free space 377 ohm impendance, coud give very interesting effects while playing with.

Regards

Enjoykin

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Zanzal posted this 2 weeks ago

 

it is very important to know the specs of our DVM, mine in AC voltage is not more than 50 Khz and DC maximum 5 Khz.

Hey Jagau, its definitely a consideration, but not always a huge issue. From what I know and what I've observed as long as the frequency oscillations are not erratic then sampling rate of your device and the frequency oscillations can significantly increase the margin of error especially when the frequency closely matches the sampling rate or a factor of it. Whether or not that means overestimating or underestimating just depends on chance. Same thing should happen with an oscilloscope but often the sampling rates are much higher so they can handle high frequency more reliably. There are ways to detect this, for example if turning on and off the measuring device results in a significantly different result or the number on the meter is fluctuating wildly even when you know the signal is steady. Thank you for pointing it out though as it is a consideration that I want to keep in mind when trying to solve "The Frequency Conundrum." 

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 2 weeks ago

Hi Zanzal. hit the Magnetic Quantum Resonance Point on the head.

Try this but be cool mind and steady hands.

ps: there exist strange emission of unknown particles while grounding electro positive plate, Could try other e+, e- materials. Many configurations possible based on your setup.

Regards

Enjoykin

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Zanzal posted this 2 weeks ago

Here is an updated schematic that should prove an interesting experiment. It demonstrates an idea that small voltage oscillations can induce greater voltage oscillations when a system is in resonance.

 

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Zanzal posted this 2 weeks ago

Wistiti, you and Enjoykin were correct, the addition of a ground was beneficial. I found that virtual ground worked better for this experiment than earth ground. IMO the most important take away from this experiment is that voltage oscillations can be amplified without current. Or so it appears. The challenge is turning those oscillations into useful work.

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Chris posted this 2 weeks ago

Do you have any suggestions for improving the conversion efficiency of the Avramenko plugs? I tried Schottky diodes but they actually seem to perform worse. If you have any insight into how to make the Avramenko plugs more efficient even modest improvement could result in gains needed to push this into overunity.

 

Hey Zanzal, if I may say, to push the Energy Boundary, if your original schematic is still your current one, you will need to add one or more coils to bring up your Kinetic Energy Rate. You will need Partnered Output Coils.

They work in many different ways, but I have outlined two ways that are the easiest in my pages as you know. DMM's at frequency are really no good, they could give any reading, close or miles away and one would never know.

You need to take each Electron and Ion and get them moving.

Apologies, I do not wish to change your path, but I need to be straight up, if the Unity Boundary is your goal, one Coil in Resonance is not enough!

   Chris

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Zanzal posted this 2 weeks ago

Thanks Chris. I added an L3 coil approximately the same as the L2 to test the idea. I put it in series with the L2 in both a bucking and non-bucking configuration. It did seem to work a little better (both configurations about the same). I realize that most experimenters looking for raw OU are probably not impressed with this little experiment, but for me this is a very strange effect. Something I can work on while waiting for parts to arrive for other experiments. I haven't shared my ideas on exactly what is happening here as I'd rather wait until I can prove them, but if I thought I was wasting my time I'd have already moved on.

 

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Chris posted this 2 weeks ago

Hey Zanzal - My Friend, every Experiment is Important! 

I very much appreciate this valuable experiment being shared for others to see and learn from!

When a Coil is in resonance, the internal impedance of the Insulated Copper Conductor is at Minimum, if you like it becomes a Waveguide, where wave reflections are pretty much Zero! The Electromagnetic Wave can travel Un-Impeded!

A very important concept to see and grasp!

Thank You for sharing your excellent Work!

   Chris 

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Zanzal posted this 6 days ago

In exploring the Lenz free pickup coil concept I discovered something that was quite surprising. If I oscillated only one end of the primary coil at the resonant frequency of the system the secondary would develop a large voltage wave. This has led me to consider the possibility that voltage oscillations alone can be used to create power. If the magnitude of the power created varies with the amplitude of the input voltage oscillations one must consider that at some point the power to create such oscillations will be significant less than the power put out. Consider this example:

Concept Oscillator

A device which is represented by a relay is used to connect the wire to one end of an arbitrary voltage source. The wire is never connected to both terminals of the source at the same time, its reference voltage simply changes in relation to the previous time period. According to everything I've seen the power in the secondary at resonance will increase with the size of our voltage source. At some point the power obtained from this system can exceed the power put in.

I believe this to be true, based on observations so far, but there are many problems with it. First, the frequency at which my setup operates makes the concept oscillator impossible to test. Now if my transformer had a lower resonance frequency this would be more possible. With say 100HZ resonance frequency it could be tested using a relay making verification or falsification of this concept easy.

Another potential problem that remains to be tested for is whether the system would still draw its power from the voltage source (capacitively rather than inductively). That's a distinct possibility. But one problem at a time, first I have to figure out how to produce the conditions needed to measure that. In the event that it does not draw power portional to the output from the source, then all that is needed is a rather large stack of otherwise dead batteries to use as a voltage reference.

 

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Chris posted this 6 days ago

Hey Zanzal, similar, not the same is my One Wire Replication

Thanks for sharing!

   Chris

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 6 days ago

Hey Zanzal,

Why dont try Mr.Preva configuration in your setuip ?

 

Regards

Enjoykin

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 6 days ago

In exploring the Lenz free pickup coil concept I discovered something that was quite surprising. If I oscillated only one end of the primary coil at the resonant frequency of the system the secondary would develop a large voltage wave. This has led me to consider the possibility that voltage oscillations alone can be used to create power. If the magnitude of the power created varies with the amplitude of the input voltage oscillations one must consider that at some point the power to create such oscillations will be significant less than the power put out. Consider this example:

Concept Oscillator

A device which is represented by a relay is used to connect the wire to one end of an arbitrary voltage source. The wire is never connected to both terminals of the source at the same time, its reference voltage simply changes in relation to the previous time period. According to everything I've seen the power in the secondary at resonance will increase with the size of our voltage source. At some point the power obtained from this system can exceed the power put in.

I believe this to be true, based on observations so far, but there are many problems with it. First, the frequency at which my setup operates makes the concept oscillator impossible to test. Now if my transformer had a lower resonance frequency this would be more possible. With say 100HZ resonance frequency it could be tested using a relay making verification or falsification of this concept easy.

Another potential problem that remains to be tested for is whether the system would still draw its power from the voltage source (capacitively rather than inductively). That's a distinct possibility. But one problem at a time, first I have to figure out how to produce the conditions needed to measure that. In the event that it does not draw power portional to the output from the source, then all that is needed is a rather large stack of otherwise dead batteries to use as a voltage reference.

 

Whole Tesla's one wave transmission was based on standing waves.

Make 3D sensor i have posted earlier to discover, node and antinode points along the wave guide.

 

Regards

Enjoykin

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Zanzal posted this 5 days ago

Progress update: I've found an alternative to using the the Tesla coil/slayer exciter L2. I have 3 pot core transformers and during testing two of them tested very well. Though they currently produce lower voltage they are easier to wind and test and compact as well. The output is not as great as the air core setup but the size difference more than makes up for it. The rules for this type of system do not follow the rules of magnetic induction. Normally turn ratios determine output. This type of approach seems to favor surface and contact area. As an example, I made a new L1 for my L2 coil increasing the turns from 5 to 15 and the voltage went up. That's not consistent with magnetic induction.

I remembered Evostars was working on something like this and checked out some of his videos. If anyone wants to check out his videos under:

https://www.youtube.com/user/Evostarss

I thought it was cool last year but didn't really understand what he was working on the first time I saw his videos. He shows some stuff using pancake coils in nice arrangements that look like they would work very well for this approach. Though I am going to stick with the pot cores, it could be a good alternative. If I did this I'd probably make PCB pancake coils or conical coils.

Unfortunately all my most recent attempts to build a microwatt boosted oscillator have failed at the breadboard level. The simulator says ~30mW for 10pF 50V @ 350kHz and ~130mW for 10pF 200V @ 350kHZ but apparently I need to know something about Q factor to build a boost converter that operates at those frequencies. Actual power numbers will probably 20-30% higher since the ideal parts don't exist and will likely have to make some compromises.

@Enjoykin, I agree with you and Chris regarding the similarities this has with one wire transmission concepts. The transmission part is clearly there. I am trying and avoid associating this with specific phenomena mostly because I don't know enough about as an example, longitudinal waves, to make those types of claims. I know some people like to dress up their devices with mythical claims, but I am really just interested in things I can definitively prove and I'll leave the explanation as to why for those who know such things.

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 4 days ago

Hey Zanzal

PCB pancake coils you can design in a couple of minutes using sprint layout 6.

 

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Zanzal posted this 3 days ago

Here is a circuit that someone might find useful:

Solid State HV Oscillator

I successfully breadboarded it using MPSA42/MPSA92 transistors. I only tested it up to 36V and it seemed to work pretty good at frequencies under 80kHZ. The wave form is not as square as the simulator would have one believe. The transistors seem to have some trouble turning off and that creates distortion and wastes lots of power. Care must be taken to balance the resistance against the transistors gain to ensure that too much current is not allowed to flow. Ideally only small current would flow at transition periods. I think lower gain transistors would be a benefit here allowing for smaller resistances and faster response times, that's just a guess really.

Results of testing were somewhat mixed. I was not able to run it stable at the frequencies needed to test my air core, and my pot cores have very low output. Still it was able to run at the resonance frequencies of some of the pot cores and did not seem to produce as bright output as the signal generator. The power usage was 36V at up to 8mA and as low as 2mA at lower frequencies. Efficiency could be much higher if the transistors didn't take so long to turn off.

The distorted wave form can be an issue. Testing with the signal generator shows that the wave forms impact the output: Square > Sine > triangle > sawtooth volt per volt. If anyone has done some experiments with this and has some additional observations, or has some ideas on how I can improve my circuit let me know.

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Marathonman posted this 3 days ago

I am curious if you have a resistor tied to the gate and to ground so the NPN can switch off quicker. PNP will be tied to the positive side if used. also a schmitt trigger sharpens up a signal very nice. each are 50 mhz bandwidth transistors so that's good.

Circuit diagram would be helpful.

Marathonman

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Zanzal posted this 3 days ago

Circuit diagram would be helpful.

Hey Marathonman,

The circuit diagram is included as a link in the post. It's a little hard to see but its up there. If you use that link you can view the complete circuit less the 5V regulator in Falstad's CircuitJS. Pull up/down are there. Maybe 1M is too much, I can play around with smaller resistance values for those and it shouldn't hurt anything too much. Thanks.

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Zanzal posted this 3 days ago

Changing the pull up/down to 10k from 1M helped a lot. The transistors are now shutting off quickly and the circuit draws around 500uA. Wave form still starts to distort significantly around 65-70kHZ. Probably the 3.9M resistors are too high for those frequencies. I'll edit the link above to reflect the updated resistance values.

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Enjoykin2118 posted this 2 days ago

Original MULTIK HV GENERATOR  for Rimiliy Fedorovitch Avramenko 3,73kV experiment

HQ picture

http://pixs.ru/showimage/MultikHVge_3984102_29963725.jpg

1st Ether key

 

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Marathonman posted this 2 days ago

I will still look over your circuit but you do realize the UC3845 has a very low frequency bandwidth. if it is used beyond this it will distort.

Marathonman

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Marathonman posted this 2 days ago

OPS ! i did not see that spark gap in the right side ....different ball game all together.

 

MarathonMAN

Zanzal posted this 19 hours ago

So many important lessons learned regarding this phenomena over the last few days. The short of it was I was able to use my signal generator to produce 150mW using a virtual ground (unearthed metal furniture). I was able to simplify the system again. The previous diagram I showed using a transformer should instead be viewed as two inductors in series with a capacitor between them. The primary coil can then be discarded leaving us a capacitor and an inductor. The signal generator feeds into a small 2nF capacitor and at one end of the inductor the SG voltage is seen but at the other end the voltage is amplified (when in resonance). The behavior of the system remains unchanged. Inductors can be added in parallel or series. Light and power can be produced using LEDs to form the bridge rectifier (use a small schottky diode to protect them against failure). A direct self-loop is impossible as it collapses the effect, but there should be nothing preventing pumping power back into the source via a transformer.

The capacitor is technically not needed except it reinforces a separation between the system. Electrons cannot cross the dielectric thereby ensuring that the source is not providing current into the system. Likewise self-looping (attaching the negative output to the negative of the source input) will result in current flowing and the effect doesn't manifest. The behavior can be tested with any inductor, though nano-perm is the worst core material for this and air the best other materials can offer good compromise.

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Wistiti posted this 19 hours ago

Hi Zanzal! When the time permit, can you draw a diagram or your last testing?

Thank you and again, appreciate your sharing.

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Zanzal posted this 10 hours ago

Hey Wistiti,

I personally don't feel it is very relevant to draw my exact test setup. I change it all the time on a whim to test different combinations. I'm mainly just working through permutations to see what makes things better or worse. Last couple nights I was testing inductors in parallel, so I was using 2 nF cap feeding 4 inductors in parallel each terminating onto their own LED-schottky (so 8xLEDs and 4xschottky) and feeding into the same capacitor. But then my testing shows me that 4 in parallel didn't really do much better than 3 or even 2. Most of the power came from the first inductor and adding more in parallel resulted in significantly diminishing returns. Whether that was due to my arrangement or whatever, it doesn't matter. Don't mistake my observations for rules. I've had conflicting observations so even if I think something doesn't work, another test may show that it does. The test I did with 150mW output I had a large ceramic magnet I was using to saturate the inductors just to see if I could get the power output up. 

If you want to test it out you must have a signal generator of some sort and preferably at least 12V or more square wave. Use a high mH inductor if you want a low resonant frequency. String multiple inductors in series and it will lower the resonant frequency (by increasing the inductance). High resistance inductors seem to produce less power, not sure if that is a rule. Here are some explanatory diagrams -


 

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Wistiti posted this 9 hours ago

Ok thank you for the clarification!

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